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Press Releases and Publications

Press releases and special publications.

Introduction to the Sonar Bell

An in-depth look at underwater position location and identification using the Sonar Bell from SALT

FACSS 2009

Analysis of Ancient Roman Pigments by Portable E-Ray Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopies

Mary Kate Donais, David George

Saint Anselm College
 

Sally Roberts, Jack Roberts, Eric Wu

Symphotic TII Corporation
 

AIChE 2008 Meeting, Philadelphia, PA

A Portable Remote Chemical Analyzer for Identification of Deposits at Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

Troy A. Wilfong1, Jack Roberts2,  Michael Melton6, and Erid Wu, Kevin Pan2.
Abstract-- Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage in pressurized water reactors leaves a white boric acid residue that is corrosive to reactor components. However, not every white deposit found in a PWR is boric acid, and identification of unknown deposits can be crucial in determining if an active leak exists. Current methods for identifying the source of unidentified deposits require a sample to be removed and analyzed using radiometric techniques. This approach is time-consuming, requires potential exposure of personnel to radiation, suffers from false positives, and may not be possible in locations that are inaccessible or where only small amounts of deposits exist. A new technique based on Raman spectroscopy allows in-situ analysis and positive identification of boric acid residue. This technique can also determine the state of hydration of the boric acid which will help understand the nature of the source of the residue. The spectroscopic analyses of other common materials that may be mistaken for boric acid are also presented.

Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) has identified a need for a field test to determine unequivocally if an unidentified deposit is boric acid, either from a reactor coolant solution (RCS) pressure boundary leak or a spill. Formerly, potential pressure boundary leaks were identified by visual identification of white deposits, followed by laboratory confirmation using radiometric techniques. Radiometric techniques, however, do not determine that a white deposit is RCS, which is predominantly boric acid, and such techniques are subject to false positives and errors in interpretation. Also, there is significant cost associated with removal of a sample from the suspected leak site and laboratory analysis, both in time and increased radiation exposure to personnel.

PNVGS and Symphotic TII have developed a technique for in-situ analysis that gives positive identification of boric acid deposits without requiring removal of a sample for laboratory analysis.

This project won a 2006 NEI, Top Industry Practice Award.

Publications for Download:

Please contact us for information on these publications:

  • Optical Micro-Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Extracted from AFI Crystals by Visible Emission and Raman Scattering.  Jian-Ting YE, Nobuko NAKA, Yasushi MORIHIRA, Zi-Kang TANG, Wei-kun GE, Ping SHENG, Igor KUDRYASHOV, and Nobukata NAGASAWA: Japanese Journal of Allied Physics, Vol. 43, No. 10, 2004, pp. 7354-7355.

  • Optical Nano-Tomography on Photosensitive Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays in Zeolite Crystals. Nobukata NAGASAWA, Hirokazu SUGIYAMA, Nobuko NAKA, Igor KUDRYASHOV, Zhao-Ming LI and Zi-Kang TANG: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2004, pp. 868-871.

  • Optical Micro-Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Extracted from AFI Crystals by Visible Emission and Raman Scattering.  Jian-Ting YE, Nobuko NAKA, Yasushi MORIHIRA, Zi-Kang TANG, Wei-kun GE, Ping SHENG, Igor KUDRYASHOV, and Nobukata NAGASAWA: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 43, No. 10, 2004, pp. 7354-7355.

    N. Nagasawa, H. Sugiyama, N.Naka, I. Kudryashov, M. Watanabe, T. Hayashi, I. Bozovic, N. Bozovic, G. Li, Z. Li, Z.K. Tang
     

  • Visible emission of single wall carbon nanotubes formed in micro-channels of zeolite crystals N. Nagasawa, H. Sugiyama, N. Naka, I. Kudryashov, M. Watanabe, T. Hayashi, I. Bozovic, N. Bosovic, G. Li, Z.K. Tang.

    Abstract: Emission spectroscopy is performed to study the optical transitions between electronic bands of SWCNs formed in AlPO4-5 (AFI )crystal. Strong visible emission is observed under laser light illumination at room temperature. The emission is excited by the light polarized along the c- axis and its polarization is also along this direction. On the other hand, non-linear emission is observed under the resonant excitation of the lowest absorption band of SWCNs. The emission is excited by the light polarized along the c—axis, but it shows the polarization perpendicular to the c—axis. The polarization character is discussed on the basis of the selection rules of the optical transitions predicted by the full line-group symmetry of SWCNs.
    (c)2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
    PACS: 78.67.Ch;81.07.De
    Keywords: Carbon nanotubes;Zeolite;Optical absorption;Optical non-linearity
     

  • Optical Nano-Tomography on Photosensitive Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays in Zeolite Crystals. Nobukata NAGASAWA, Hirokazu SUGIYAMA, Nobuko NAKA, Igor KUDRYASHOV, Zhao-Ming LI and Zi-Kang TANG: Japanese Journal of Allied Physics, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2004, pp. 868-871.

  • Three-dimensional mapping of Photoluminescence and Raman Spectra.  I. Kudryashov, A. Gvozdev, V. Zhihimontov, A. Volkov, E. Vanagas, S. Juodkazis, H. Misawa.

  • Visible Emissions of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Formed in Zeolite Crystals.  N. Nagasawa, I. Kudryashov, and Z. K. Tang
    Abstract: Mono-sized, aligned and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) of about 0.4 nm diameter are formed inside micro-channel array of a zeolite single crystal. Since they are forced to align along c-axis of the crystal, they show strong polarization anisotropy in the optical absorption from near infrared to visible region [1]. The crystal is opaque in the polarization configuration E//c , but is almost transparent in E?c , where E is the electric field vector of the incident light. We have found strong emissions in visible regions under the monochromatic photo-excitations at room temperature. They showed strong polarization correlation with the absorption spectra. To know the spatial distribution of the emission sources and the origins, 3D micro-tomographic measurements are performed using the "Nanofinder" of nano-scale spatial resolution [2]. In this paper, we discuss these polarization characteristics in view of the selection rules of relevant optical transitions on the basis of the band calculation obtained by the LDA. [1] Z.K.Tang, Z.M.Li, G.D.Li, N.Wang, H.J.Li and C.T.Chan, to be published in the Proceedings of Inter. Symposium on Network Materials: Fullerenes, Nanotubes, and Related Systems, ISNM2001, Kamakura, Japan. [2] N.Nagasawa, I.Kudryashov, S.Tsuda, and Z.K.Tang, to be published in the Proceedings of ISNM2001

  • Heteroepitaxial growth of wurtzite InN films on Si.111. exhibiting strong near-infrared photoluminescence at room temperature  S. Gwo, C.-L. Wu, and C.-H. Shen W.-H. Chang and T. M. Hsu(Received 1 December 2003; accepted 10 March 2004; published online 29 April 2004) Abstract: High-quality InN epitaxial films have been grown by nitrogen-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates using a double-buffer technique. Growth of a (0001)  -oriented single crystalline wurtzite–InN layer was confirmed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. At room temperature, these films exhibited strong near-infrared ~0.6–0.9 eV! photoluminescence (PL). In addition to the optical absorption measurement of absorption edge and direct band nature, the PL signal was found to depend linearly on the excitation laser intensity over a wide intensity range. These results indicate that the observed PL is due to the emission of direct band-to-band recombination rather than the band-to-defect (or impurity) deep emission. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. @DOI: 10.1063/1.1738183


 

Copyright © 2015 Symphotic TII Corporation
Last modified: 09/22/15
Copyright © 2015 Symphotic TII Corporation
Last modified: 10/17/16